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Changing Our Vocabulary as Technology Integration Coaches

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Changing Our Vocabulary as Technology Integration Coaches

This Tuesday afternoon, from 1-3 pm, I’ll be sharing a poster session at the ISTE Conference in San Antonio on the topic, “Changing Our Vocabulary as Technology Integration Coaches.” The basic idea is that non-techy terms are important when we want to win the hearts and minds of parents as well as other teachers in our rapidly changing digital information landscape. It’s easy to intimidate or confuse someone with acronyms, when it comes to educational technology or almost any other field. If we can avoid jargon when we talk about media products students can produce to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of concepts, it can help others open their minds to new possibilities instead of being closed off.

Here is the image I’m using for my actual poster in the session. It’s also available as a PDF file. Feel free to use and share this if it’s helpful to you – The hand drawn graphics are part of the “Mapping Media to the Common Core” website and framework.

Changing Our Vocabulary for Technology Integration

These are the paragraphs I’m including in my forthcoming eBook, “Mapping Media to the Common Core: Volume I” on this subject:

Acronyms and jargon can easily confuse and turn-off someone with whom you’re having a conversation. The names of the media products in Mapping Media to the Common Core were deliberately selected to avoid confusion and the “intimidation factor” which can set in when people start using “techy terms.” Instead of using the world “blog,” talk with other teachers about “interactive writing.” Instead of talking about making a podcast, talk about creating a “radio show.” Instead of talking about a specific tool or platform like AudioBoo for recording student voices and adding a related photo, discuss the value of creating “narrated art” together.

All of the media product terms in the Mapping Media framework are worded so they are neither device nor platform specific. While the author is an enthusiastic proponent of using iOS devices (iPads, iPhones, and iPod Touches) to create media products as well as Google’s free web tools like YouTube, Google Docs and Blogger, teachers and students do NOT have to use Apple computing devices nor Google’s web services to create the media products in this framework. Whatever your hardware, software, and connectivity options may be, the author encourages you to “use them well” and help students create multimedia products which can become part of their digital portfolios. Adopt a technology use philosophy similar to this sign in the instructional technology consultants’ hallway in Saskatoon Public Schools, Saskatchewan: “Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.”

Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.


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Learning about Visual Notetaking from Giulia Forsythe

In the process of writing and finalizing the chapter on “Visual Notetaking” for my forthcoming eBook, “Mapping Media to the Common Core,” I found Giulia Forsythe‘s blog page “Visual Practice” and her WONDERFUL presentation a year ago for the 2012 University of Mary Washington Faculty Academy. Her presentation slides are available on SlideShare, and the entire 68 minute, recorded presentation is on Vimeo. I highly recommend you watch this entire presentation if you’re interested (as you should be) in learning more about visual notes.

Giulia Forsythe at Faculty Academy 2012 from umwnewmedia on Vimeo.

In her presentation, Giulia cites and recommends several books related to learning, cognition, brain research, drawing and visual notes. These include the following titles, which I’ve added to my own Amazon wish list.

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain: The Definitive, 4th Edition by Betty Edwards

Keys to Drawing by Bert Dodson

Keys to Drawing with Imagination by Bert Dodson

Now You See It: How Technology and Brain Science Will Transform Schools and Business for the 21st Century by Cathy N. Davidson

Thinking in Pictures, Expanded Edition: My Life with Autism by Temple Grandin

All the above links are to the Kindle eBook versions of the respective books.

Giulia also referenced “The Art of Changing the Brain: Enriching the Practice of Teaching by Exploring the Biology of Learning by James E. Zull.” Unfortunately it’s just available as a paperback from Amazon, but I found (via Google) an openly posted PDF version by a Vietnamese professor teaching in France. Not sure what the backstory on that is.

Giulia’s work as a visual notetaker has been and continues to be incredibly inspiring as well as challenging to me. As a teacher and a learner, I want to have the artistic and instructional courage of Giulia Forsythe.

#umwfa12 @timmmyboy talking maker spaces

Of the six “media products” in this first volume eBook of “Mapping Media to the Common Core,” visual note taking is definitely the one I feel most uncomfortable with and least skilled at doing. That’s exactly why I think I need to practice my visual notetaking skills more. As Giulia encourages us in this video, we ALL can learn to draw effectively, but we need practice. When I drew the icons for “Mapping Media to the Common Core,” in several instances I found icons I liked on iconfinder.net but then drew my own versions. I’ve learned this is something other artists do too.

What Do You Want to Create Today?

My modified icon for “Visual Notetaking” is used with permission from an amazing original Giulia created last summer at Unplug’d 2012 in Canada.

UnPlug'd 2012 Visual Notes

Do you take visual notes YET? Have you taught your own students about visual notetaking or graphic facilitation YET? In addition to watching Guilia’s presentation video, check out some of the other videos and tutorials on the “Visual Notetaking” page of “Mapping Media to the Common Core.” VERY inspiring ideas to both apply personally and share with students!


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Sleet Sledding: The Movie (fun with iMovie for iPhone Trailers)

Today is a day of great rejoicing in central Oklahoma: It sleeted overnight and schools are closed. Although it technically isn’t much of a “snow day,” we haven’t had many chances to go sledding the past few years so Rachel and I headed out to seek a winter adventure this morning. I shot some video with my iPhone5, and used the “trailer project” feature of iMovie for iPhone for the first time to create the following winter classic, “Sleet Sledding.” I uploaded this with the free YouTube Capture app in 720p. Enjoy!

The “trailer project” feature of iMovie for iPhone lets you choose a theme and customize it, specifying the types of clips you should insert for each part of the trailer storyboard.

iMovie for iPhone Trailer Project

I really like how it shows you (with a yellow line) which parts of your videos you’ve used already, so you won’t have any repeated footage in your final production.

IMG_7943.PNG

I initially thought I’d try using a different video editing app, other than iMovie, to piece together some of our videos from today. An iMovie trailer proved to be even better, however, and the final product exceeded my expectations.

I love using Apple’s creative digital tools.

Where’s the “iMovie for Android with movie trailer capabilities,” you ask? I don’t think that app exists yet. Will someone develop it? Maybe. But since they haven’t, why would anyone with a desire to create media (who has the means, of course) use any smartphone other than an iPhone?

Sleet Sledders


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Order your copy of Mapping Media to the Common Core: Vol I" and "Playing with Media: simple ideas for powerful sharing" by Wesley Fryer, Ph.D. Individual book chapters for the first six media products in the "Mapping Media to the Curriculum" framework are also available in the PlayingWithMedia eStore and as eBook singles from Amazon.com.